Reunion

In Early-2015, Covo, a coworking space in San Francisco, commissioned a large installation piece for the entry of their new flagship location on Mission St.

The resulting artwork, titled Reunion, was installed in June 2016 and debuted at Covo’s grand opening in August 2016.

Reunion, 9.5 ft. x 10 ft., 2016

Reunion, 9.5 ft. x 10 ft., 2016

Reunion, is to date my largest and most ambitious work. It was a heartfelt collaboration with my woodworker Father, James Konwinski, and commissioned by a wonderful company and team in San Francisco: Rebecca Brian Pan, Jason Pan, and Dan Brian. For several years I had been sketching variations of this structure, imagining it on every empty wall I sat in front of for too long. When Covo asked for a piece around 100 sqft, the initial sketch came to life almost instantly.

I designed 9.5 foot long maple frames spread out across 10 feet, anchored into place by large walnut beams, with 5 distinct redwood pieces left raw and unfinished to hang from the uneven shape of the frames. One continuous drawing was made that stretches across the length of the panels. In all it was 8 months of planning, 6 more months and 1000 hours of drawing, and three trips from NY to California to source just the right salvage redwood from Anderson’s Alternatives in Mendocino.

Initial sketch for Reunion (2015)

Initial sketch for Reunion (2015)

Walnut beams were chosen to anchor the piece into the rafters above and hold the maple frames in place. Once the redwood pieces were chosen, the angles of the shorter frames were solidified so that drawing could begin.

The frames and superstructure, preassembled in James’s shop, several weeks before installation. (2016)

The frames and superstructure, preassembled in James’s shop, several weeks before installation. (2016)

Nearing the end of the drawing, at my studio in Bushwick, Brooklyn (2016)

Nearing the end of the drawing, at my studio in Bushwick, Brooklyn (2016)

I had only a rough sense of the movement I wanted across the panels, tying the drawing together. The paper was cut and taped into place exactly as it would fit into the frames, so that the perspective would remain consistent.

James fitting the frames with a plexiglass backing to attach the redwood pieces.

James fitting the frames with a plexiglass backing to attach the redwood pieces.

The frames were built toward the end of the project, at James’s shop in San Rafael, CA. The frames were made to simply hook into place across the walnut beams. This way, no hardware showed externally.

The Redwood was the last to be attached. Plexiglass was cut to the shape of each redwood piece and fixed to the back of the frames. If you’d like to see more of Reunion’s development, please click below to view the Photo Diary.